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It's Alive! Exciting Earth Science Experiments

Earth Science is such a fascinating subject that literally goes from below sea level straight up into the night sky. As teachers, we are always looking for exciting, new experiments to jazz up our lessons. I scoured the internet for some new takes on good old science, and here's what I came up with:
A Collection By Sian Babish
  • 10 Collection Items
  • 10 Collection Items
  • Discussion
It's Alive! Exciting Earth Science Experiments
  • Incredible Egg Geode

    Website
    stevespanglerscience.com
    stevespanglerscience.com
    Sian Babish says:
    Steve Spangler walks you through making an egg into a geode. There's a video plus a step-by-step picture guide, so it's extremely easy to follow. If students really dig it, there are some links to related experiments on the bottom!
  • Sian Babish says:
    Everyone's favorite science guy, Bill Nye, shares this oceanography experiment about salt water. Nye shows how density affects currents, which essentially keeps everything in constant motion. You can easily replicate the experiment with basic science lab supplies.
  • Sian Babish says:
    George Mehler walks us through this air pressure demonstration. It's quick, inexpensive, and who doesn’t like balloons? Mehler explains the experiment so well that students can actually follow the video and do it along with him.
  • Sian Babish says:
    This experiment is designed to give students some insight into the thinking process of building an earthquake-proof building. There is a printable handout for students to complete as well as three separate challenges from the experiment. It can also be a great overlap with a geometry lesson!
  • Sian Babish says:
    Students can construct a simple weathervane and use the printable PDF to record data. It's a great way to watch science in motion, and to learn a very important aspect of the scientific method. The vanes can be as simple as jusy a coffee can, pencil, and cardboard, but I'm sure students can get creative and make some that are both artistic and functional.
  • Sian Babish says:
    Mirjam Glessmer delivers a through lesson on temperature-driven circulation. She explains the experiment, includes a practical video, and makes supply recommendations for the best results. Since she mentions it's her favorite experiment, I'm sure students will enjoy it as well!
  • Sian Babish says:
    Dave Ansell uses a fizzy drink and wallpaper paste to show the reaction of a volcano. The instructions are clear and he includes a video clip of what to expect during the experiment. There are diagrams illustrating the pressure and carbon dioxide, which may be helpful for students to see.
  • Sian Babish says:
    The Royal Meteorological Society shows you how to make hot air rise with a tea bag, matches, and small plate. It's a simple 3-step experiment, but be sure to read the safety disclaimer under equipment. The handout is really clear and informational, and links students to a YouTube video where you can watch the experiment instead.
  • Sian Babish says:
    Dr. Sara Agee designed this experiment for ScienceBuddies.org. Students get to test whether a layer of blubber is a helpful adaptation for cold-water environment with some shortening. There is a printable table where students can record the temperature and other findings.
  • Sian Babish says:
    Geology.com explains how you can get small grants for your science class. Funding can be as small as a couple hundred dollars, and all you need to do is draft a project proposal. The page has an encouraging tone, so I would say it's definitely worth a shot!
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BloomBoard Asks:How can I make earth science really come alive with hands-on experiments?