Upper Elementary
History & Social Studies

Ten Exciting Takes on Teaching Benjamin Franklin

Benjamin Franklin is one of the most interesting figures in American History. Since he accomplished so many incredible things in his lifetime, teacher and students alike should celebrate his contributions to society. It's easy to see there aren't many industries or fields Franklin wasn't involved in!
A Collection By Sian Babish
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Ten Exciting Takes on Teaching Benjamin Franklin
  • Sian Babish says:
    Students will have a blast when they learn about Franklin's contributions to science. The lesson plan makes the important point that students should be aware that many of these inventions are used today, and have been adapted into other forms of technology. With the discussion of science, students also learn the concepts of observation and inquiry.
  • Sian Babish says:
    Print this fun activity so students can assemble a flip-tab kite that will hold a collection of facts about Benjamin Franklin. It's a simple, quick activity that can be completed with basic classroom supplies. This idea can also be adapted into other shapes for future lessons about different subjects!
  • Sian Babish says:
    The videos are around ten minutes each, and offer a good overview of the two major focuses in Franklin's life: science and American government.
  • Sian Babish says:
    If you happen to be close to Philadelphia, you really should stop by the Benjamin Franklin Museum with your students. They offer guided tours as well as a variety of exhibits and a calendar of events. Admission is free for some school groups, so check with the museum's visitor office to see whether you qualify.
  • Sian Babish says:
    Ben Franklin and static electricity go together, so give your students the chance to get a "shocking" connection as well. In this science experiment, students will understand the cause and effect of static electricity with balloons and socks. It's a great way to introduce your class to protons, electrons, and neutrons!
  • Sian Babish says:
    This is a fun historical fiction novel for ages 10 and up. While we know Franklin didn't exactly get "all his good ideas" from a mouse named Amos, it's a fun read for students with a good sense of humor. Don't be fooled by its fictional qualities; it also includes some real information, including a travel map, fun facts, and Ben Franklin triva you never knew!
  • Sian Babish says:
    This cartoon short presents Benjamin Franklin's involvement with the postal service. It's about 28 minutes long, but it's really engaging and lively with music. You might be pleased to recognize the voice of John Adams: it's Billy Crystal!
  • Sian Babish says:
    Not only does this worksheet address Benjamin Franklin's establishment of fire companies, it's also a great tool for teaching fire safety. It also details a "Firefighter Relay" activity, as well as how to stay fire-safe at home. It would be great as the focus of an integrated American History-Science lesson!
  • Sian Babish says:
    The Gerald R. Ford Presidential Museum spent a lot of time putting together this 60-page resource for teachers. It gives a timeline of events, field trip activities, and gives different lesson ideas for grades K-2 and 3-5. If ever there was a comprehensive teaching resource for Benjamin Franklin, this would be it!
  • Sian Babish says:
    Use the wordsheet builder to generate a Benjamin Franklin word search for your class. This is great for younger students that are just getting acquainted with some of the vocabulary terms of your lesson. You can even add your own words to the mix!
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BloomBoard Asks:How do I touch upon as much as Benjamin Franklin's history as possible?