Lower Elementary1 more
Cross-Curricular

Trouble With the Curve: Dysgraphia

Some students struggle with writing coherently, and it could be due to dysgraphia in some cases. These resources can help you to spot dysgraphia, as well as provide support in your classroom. You'll discover small accommodations can lead to big-time results, both in the students' work and their confidence.
A Collection By Sian Babish
  • 9 Collection Items
  • 9 Collection Items
  • Discussion
Trouble With the Curve: Dysgraphia
  • Sian Babish says:
    Teaching Exceptional Children Plus published this case study by Alyssa Crouch and Jennifer Jakubecy in 2007. The study applies several techniques to discover which would be most helpful to the test participant, Sam. There are also pictures of handwriting samples as well as rubric tables, so the research is really nicely displayed over the course of 13 pages.
  • Sian Babish says:
    Accommodations for a student with dysgraphia can be really small, but make a huge difference. Amanda Morin puts together this quick-reference table so teachers and students alike can get onboard and work through it together. It even links to some apps that might be helpful for the student at home.
  • Sian Babish says:
    Lindsay Knobelauch, M.Ed., CCC-SLP created this guide to help educators spot the symptoms of dysgraphia. Not only does it list the formal clinical exams that would be administered, it also lists some accommodations. This would be a great resources for teachers to use while they work with a Child Study Team.
  • Sian Babish says:
    Meet "GeekBoy," a 10-year-old who tells of his early struggles with dysgraphia. He is filmed demonstrating how physically tiring the process of writing used to be. Now he's excited to share all of the ways he works through dysgraphia, and inspires other young students with his story. According to the comments under the video, he is a successful high school student these days!
  • Sian Babish says:
    Dysgraphia can come in more than one form, so here is a specific guide to each one. It also takes the time to detail the connection between stress and dysgraphia, and how it can manifest in other areas of life. It also takes an alternate approach to "practice makes perfect," as change is more important than repetition to some students with dysgraphia.
  • Sian Babish says:
    Carrie Lippincott, OTR/L offers ten different ways to teach handwriting to students with dysgraphia. From using different colors to repositioning the paper for certain letters, this list is sure to give teachers at least one idea they haven't tried yet! The guide also discusses how different is is to teach print from cursive handwriting.
  • edutopia.org
    edutopia.org

    iPad App for Children with Dysgraphia and Writing Difficulties

    Article
    Sian Babish says:
    Amberlynn Gifford, an OT student at Springfield College in Massachusetts, worked with her 5th grade son and his occupational therapist to develop an app for dysgraphia. It's an incredible story of innovation and technology in therapy. Download SnapType for FREE in the App Store today!
  • Sian Babish says:
    Because Dysgraphia and Dyslexia have a lot of similar symptoms, it's important to know the main differenes between them. Kate Kelly designed this simple, six-item table to tell them apart. Even the recommended accommodations are much different!
  • Sian Babish says:
    Therapy Shoppe, according to its website, is an "extraordinary little specialty shoppe" that provides all types of handwriting aides. It really is something special, especially as it offers tools got left-handed students, grasp development, and different types of notebooks!
BloomBoard SparkOther Cross-Curricular
BloomBoard Asks:How can I help my students who struggle with dysgraphia?