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Cross-Curricular

Cognitive Impairment - Dealing with the Challenges

Cognitive impairment is a reality in today’s world. Teachers have to face the reality that some day in their lives they will encounter a student or students who may be cognitively impaired at different levels. The following resources outline what cognitive impairment is and how to identify it. It also provides practical strategies and tips for teaching these students.
A Collection By Suzzanne McLean
  • 6 Collection Items
  • 6 Collection Items
  • Discussion
Cognitive Impairment - Dealing with the Challenges
  • Suzzanne McLean says:
    According to Robert John Meehan, “Each child is unique, not only capable of learning but also capable of succeeding.” As shown clearly from this presentation, there is a child that is cognitively impaired that was able to fit in class and made friends. Despite the child’s limitations, the children and the teacher were able to communicate with the child. In fact, the parents commented on the interaction of the child with students.
  • Suzzanne McLean says:
    Cognitive impairment traits can be seen in various ways. This website gives a detailed description of cognitive impairment. It also mentions how to help students with cerebral palsy. Teachers may be aware of the signs and causes of cognitive impairment and the different interventions that can be used to help these students. I am impressed with the fact teachers may assist parents in helping them to cope with the challenge. Teachers may use and apply the suggestions.
  • Suzzanne McLean says:
    Children with cognitive impairment who are non-verbal experience pain differently from children who are not cognitively- impaired. This article highlights the different categories of cognitive impairment. It also outlines the difference between the pain experience and expression. I appreciate the ”Children’s Pain Checklist” that displays behaviors that sometimes communicate pain. It is very important that teachers are very observant and be aware of many of these signs.
  • Suzzanne McLean says:
    There are strategies that can assist teachers with students who have cognitive impairment. I appreciate the strategy that deals with not putting the student on the spot by targeting them for questions or reading aloud in classes. Many educators are guilty of doing that. If the student participates, then we acknowledge them.
  • Suzzanne McLean says:
    This website outlines a list of intellectual abilities for cognitive development. I appreciate the suggestion to repeat instructions or directions frequently. This is very important since these students may have issues that involve memory, so teacher will have to be constantly repeating directions. Another suggestion that is very important is that a student should not be overwhelmed with multiple and complex instructions. Teachers will gain insight in applying these suggestions.
  • Suzzanne McLean says:
    Jean Piaget, a renowned psychologist, developed the different stages of cognitive development. For example, the sensorimotor stage tells us of toddlers and infants acquiring knowledge through their senses and manipulating objects. The different stages will give teachers insight in understanding how to deal with children that are cognitively impaired. I appreciate the concept of assimilation- taking new information into existing schema.