High School
Cross-Curricular

Accommodations for Students with Working Memory Deficits

Working Memory is often described as the "mental scratchpad" we use to temporarily hold and manipulate information. For students with deficits in working memory, which will include most students with ADHD, academic work can be a struggle. Complicated math problems and writing assignments are especially challenging. This collection will help you understand how important working memory is, and how you can accomodate students with this deficit.
A Collection By Amelia Franz
  • 9 Collection Items
  • 9 Collection Items
  • Discussion
Accommodations for Students with Working Memory Deficits
  • Amelia Franz says:
    This well-designed infographic summarizes the essential facts to help you understand working memory deficits. It includes symptoms of weak working memory and working memory strategies for teachers.
  • Amelia Franz says:
    I've heard many teachers express concern about being able to hold their lower-achieving students to the high standards of Common Core. This is the only book I found that specifically addresses Common Core and Executive Functioning, which includes working memory, attention, and other essential skills. This site also offers other books addressing Common Core and disabilities.
  • Amelia Franz says:
    This video argues that math fact (and by extension, sight word) fluency "frees up" the working memory needed to solve math problems. Interestingly, he also blames math anxiety for intrusive thoughts that distract students so that some of their working memory is unavailable to solve the math problem.
  • Amelia Franz says:
    This TED Talk explains how working memory helps us to function in the world every day. People with good working memory, according to Mr. Doolittle, are usually good storytellers and good writers. On the other hand, students with working memory deficits will have a hard time holding and manipulating the information necessary to solve a complicated math problem or write an essay. This fact suggests that graphic organizers and other meta-cognitive tools should be provided for these students.
  • Amelia Franz says:
    This page lists and reviews the top ten apps for kids' note-taking. Keep in mind that new apps are coming out every day, and this was written in 2014. They would still be worth checking out, I think. Teaching students with working memory deficits to take notes while working on multi-step tasks might be one of the more effective accomodation tools (along with graphic organizers).
  • theatln.tc
    theatln.tc

    Using Pattern Recognition to Enhance Memory and Creativity

    7 minute read
    Amelia Franz says:
    In this The Atlantic article, I learned that human working memory is not much better than that of monkeys! The "chunking" technique, in which a person associates new information with already-assimilated, meaningful information, is explained. The example given was related to improving digit recall, which is not necessarily the most useful task for students. The idea of teaching students to make meaning of newly-learned information would probably be very helpful.
  • Amelia Franz says:
    KWHL organizers allow students to record what they already know, want to know, how they will find out, and what they have learned. This will be helpful to all students, whether or not they suffer from memory problems. This is a great source for free, downloadable graphic organizers of all kinds.
  • Amelia Franz says:
    This is a very good source for learning how advance organizers can help students retain and use the information they have learned. The authors explain the different types of advance organizers, and how to use them effectively in the classroom. The excellent organization and visual design of this resource makes it very readable.
  • bit.ly
    bit.ly

    Supporting Students with Working Memory Deficits

    12 minute read
    Amelia Franz says:
    There is some good, general information here that will be helpful to teachers of students who struggle with working memory. It's worth a read. What I like best about this article is that the authors admit that actually improving working memory is complicated, and that there is no one, easy answer to helping these struggles. We don't even know for certain that working memory can actually be improved, despite all the tools that claim to do so.