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Differentiation in the Elementary Classroom

Differentiation is a term that can strike terror in the most seasoned teacher. To many, the term differentiated instruction (DI) evokes images of chaos and disorder: a classroom with students literally running wild, all engaged in a different task, with the poor teacher standing in the middle of the room while the storm rages around him (or her). In fact, differentation does not have to be anything of the sort. This collection provides resources that explain exactly what differentiation is.
A Collection By Tracy Pinkard
  • 8 Collection Items
  • 8 Collection Items
  • Discussion
Differentiation in the Elementary Classroom
  • Tracy Pinkard says:
    From the WhatsNewWithLeah blog, this infographic is a handy reference presenting practical considerations for differentiating learning. Specifically, it presents classroom management issues that must be addressed in order for differentiation to be efficient rather than disruptive. Although presented as an overview, this infographic assists in planning what differentiation will actually look like in the classroom, while also anticipating challenges that may occur.
  • Tracy Pinkard says:
    This montage video by Taylor Hansen compiles examples of differentiation in classrooms from several popular movies. I like this video, not only due to the pop culture references, but because of the way in which Hansen provides movie examples that perfectly demonstrate each of the steps of preparing for differentiation: from knowing your students to differentiating the instructional process. This video is a great reminder that differentiation is do-able!
  • teaching.monster.com
    teaching.monster.com

    Using Technology to Differentiate Instruction

    5 minute read
    Tracy Pinkard says:
    This article by Kelly Tenkely presents various technology resources that can be used to differentiate the learning process and learning product based on students' learning styles. Tenkely takes the guess work out of finding effective and engaging ways to use websites, apps, and other technology to appropriately differentiate student learning. Worth bookmarking in your browser, this is a resource that you can return to repeatedly.
  • Tracy Pinkard says:
    Paula Kluth's blog is the ultimate differentiation toolbox! Kluth provides hundreds of specific differentiation ideas and resources for elementary classrooms. From writing organizers to study tools, this blog includes resources for reading, math, social studies, and numerous other content areas. Kluth presents a brief description of each resource that makes it easy to determine if it will meet your specific instructional needs.
  • Tracy Pinkard says:
    This Smartatmath video presents concrete examples of how differentiation can be applied to presentation (instructional content), the learning process, and the learning product. This is a great resource, with an emphasis on planning to ensure efficiency and success of differentiation. It also offers logistical considerations (where will materials be stored? How will students access materials?) and suggestions that teachers can easily and quickly implement in their classrooms.
  • Tracy Pinkard says:
    Mike Leander shares an amazing infographic on his twitter feed that presents an easy to understand overview of differentiation. In one page, he presents the principles of differentiation; a brief description of differentiating content, process, product and environment; as well as, what student characteristics drive differentiation. This resource is great as a quick reference for instructional and assessment planning.
  • Tracy Pinkard says:
    I love this excerpt of chapters from the book Teacher’s Survival Guide: Differentiating Instruction in the Elementary Classroom by Roberts and Inman! Here, they present an extensive discussion of what differentiation is, why it should be used, how to differentiate, when to differentiate and what to differentiate. In addition to research findings supporting a differentiated classroom, the authors describe challenges to differentiating as well as step-by-step guidance in how to overcome these.
  • Tracy Pinkard says:
    This overview of differentiation by Carol Ann Tomlinson on the Reading Rockets website provides a great brief introduction of what differentiation is and the different ways classroom elements can be differentiated. Tomlinson describes what it means to differentiate instructional content, the learning process, learning products, as well as the learning environment. I refer to this article because it presents differentiation in a straightforward, easy-to-apply manner.
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