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Strategies to Engage the Shy Student

There is the student that volunteers for every class job, raises her hand to answer every question , and is always chatting with his buddies. Then there is the student that sits quietly throughout the lesson, engaged but never raising his hand to answer a question , by herself when the rest of the class is interacting with one another. Getting shy students to interact fully can be quite challenging. This collection includes resources discussing ways to engage the shy student.
A Collection By Tracy Pinkard
  • 8 Collection Items
  • 8 Collection Items
  • Discussion
Strategies to Engage the Shy Student
  • Tracy Pinkard says:
    This powerpoint presentation designed by Teesue Fields provides great insight into shy students. She explains in detail what shyness is, why it matters, along with strategies for assisting shy students. This is a great resource because of its relatable examples, practical solutions, and inclusion of things not to do when engaging shy students.
  • Tracy Pinkard says:
    This blog offers several engaging activities that can be used to help engage all students. Although, framed in ESL, the activities described here can definitely be used in any classroom setting at any point in the school year. An explanation as to how each activity might engage the shy student is included, along with detailed directions for completing the activity.
  • une.edu.au
    une.edu.au

    Nine ways Teachers can Help young Students overcome Shyness

    10 minute read
    Tracy Pinkard says:
    Although geared toward preschool teachers, this article by John Malouff is a terrific resource for all teachers. I like this article because he provides an overview of what shyness is, how teachers can address and monitor it, and what potential outcomes may arise. But the real gem is in the expandable sub-topics that are included. Here you can learn about the signs of shyness, effects of shyness, as well as specific strategies for assisting students in overcoming it.
  • Tracy Pinkard says:
    I love this straightforward list of ways to engage shy students. McColgan, Paliaro, Tietbohl, Wagenseller, and Galeas have put together this resource that is quick to read and easy to use, making it quite practical. A brief discussion of each strategy is presented, along with examples for some of the strategies.
  • Teaching Shy Children

    Website
    shakeyourshyness.com
    shakeyourshyness.com
    Tracy Pinkard says:
    This webpage is an awesome starting point for understanding your shy student or for digging deeper into why a student may not fully interact in class and what you can do to encourage participation. Shyness is defined, along with tips for working with shy students. Additionally, example classroom activities to encourage interaction as well as links to other helpful websites are included.
  • Tracy Pinkard says:
    This article by BBC Active is both brief and informative. Using a framework that approaches shyness as an intrapersonal skill, this article explains how to deliberately increase interaction opportunities for shy students. With a focus on patience and planning, a number of tips for creating a safe learning environment for shy students are presented.
  • westfield.ma.edu
    westfield.ma.edu

    Why So Quiet?: Strategies for Engaging Your Students in the Discussion

    10 minute read
    Tracy Pinkard says:
    Catherine Sevini provides an excellent resource with this list of strategies for engaging shy students. What makes this paper great, is that Sevini not only offers suggestions for engaging introverted students, but also examines why the student will not or cannot engage. This resource is definitely one to print out and keep on hand for quick reference.
  • Tracy Pinkard says:
    This Professional Learning Board blog offers several practical suggestions for engaging shy students. Each recommendation is detailed enough to implement immediately, yet general enough to be applied in a variety of learning environments. I love this blog because the suggestions don't require any additional materials and address the issue without stigmatizing individual students.