Upper Elementary
English Language Arts

Fun with Inferencing

Here is a collection of ideas get the inferencing ball rolling in your classroom, because. . .as the inferencing song in this Collection goes. . . “Sometimes when you’re reading a story, the words are not all there for you.” Inferencing is combining partial information (from something you read or something you observe) with what you already know in order to draw a conclusion. It’s like using clues to solve a mystery—and who doesn’t love a good mystery?
A Collection By Ula Manzo
  • 8 Collection Items
  • 8 Collection Items
  • Discussion
Fun with Inferencing
  • Ula Manzo says:
    The “secret door” foldable is so awesome! And it can be used for just about any inference-based content! Student groups can each be assigned a section: 2 front sections, 2 inside sections, the center section, and the secret section. It would be fun to have groups draw straws to see who gets to do the secret section, and then not tell the rest of the class what they decide to use until the big “reveal.”
  • Ula Manzo says:
    This is a reminder of the basics about inferencing—using a great graphic organizer format. The 1st column in the format is a question, the next is what the text says, the next is what you already know about this, and the last column is the conclusion. So, basically, it re-sequences the steps of the familiar K-W-L lesson. Instead of starting by asking students what they know about a topic, you start with a question that the text answers implicitly, and students search the text to find clues.
  • Into the Book

    Website
    reading.ecb.org
    reading.ecb.org
    Ula Manzo says:
    Find everything you need here for several short inference-based activities. The Science Mystery Bags is a really cool idea: students use smell, hearing, and touch to get clues to make inferences and draw conclusions. The T-Charts for structuring inferences based on evidence is another simple and widely adaptable idea.
  • Get in the Fold!

    Website Blog
    getinthefold.blogspot.com
    getinthefold.blogspot.com
    Ula Manzo says:
    In this lesson, students make a top pocket foldable to display their inference-based conclusions about how a character is influenced by the events in a story, and in what ways she or he changes over time. The character/events chart is a great tool to prompt student inference-making and to show off their conclusions.
  • Ula Manzo says:
    Here’s a cute interactive inferencing game. For $4.95, you can purchase the whole thing, and students can play the game on their own cell phones. Or, you could have student pairs make up clues to their own riddles, writing each clue on a separate slip of paper. The have each pair join another pair to play each other’s games. For more fun with inferencing, don’t forget good old “20 Questions.”
  • Ula Manzo says:
    What a great idea for teaching inferences: play a television program or clip from a movie without sound and have students make inferences about what is happening! This webpage offers suggestions for extending this type of activity, and more.
  • Ula Manzo says:
    The words to the song in this video are clever and catchy—and the action gets intense. I would put the lyrics on a classroom poster before having students view the video. You might also consider preparing an incomplete notes handout for students to complete as they view, and/or pausing the video periodically to have student pairs talk briefly about each segment—which get more and more outrageous as the action rolls along.
  • mrswatersenglish.com
    mrswatersenglish.com

    Teaching Inferences With Commercials

    Article
    Ula Manzo says:
    The 30-second video that kicks off this lesson is hilarious! The webpage has several additional video clips for followup, and there is a link to a free downloadable worksheet for students at Teachers Pay Teachers. I like the step of having students list each of the clues to the dog’s guilt. This would be a great warmup activity prior to any reading lesson; or, after reading, student groups or pairs could list each of the clues to any conclusion that isn’t directly stated by the author.