Middle School
Cross-Curricular

How Well Do You Know Your Students? The Anticipation-Reaction Guide

An Anticipation-Reaction Guide lesson engages students in responding to a set of statements before, during, and after a reading assignment or other learning activity. The statements are based on what the teacher knows about his or her student’s prior knowledge: what they know, what they think, or how they feel. Once they have been challenged to respond to the statements before encountering the new information, they will pay closer attention to these key points when they arise.
A Collection By Ula Manzo
  • 6 Collection Items
  • 6 Collection Items
  • Discussion
How Well Do You Know Your Students? The Anticipation-Reaction Guide
  • Ula Manzo says:
    This set-up could be used for an online class! The teacher has created to explain to his students how to complete an A-R Guide worksheet that he has created as a Google doc and shared with them. His worksheet statements really get to the heart of what his students might feel and believe about some of the issues that they will encounter when they read Poe’s The Tell-Tale Heart.
  • Ula Manzo says:
    This really got me thinking about possibilities for A-R Guide uses. This teacher is using it in a unique way to structure a guest lecturer visit. She has posted the A-R Guide statements around the classroom, and she hands out sets of stickers to place on the posters: green for agree, or red for disagree. After the students have placed their stickers, everyone can see which statements were mostly agreed with, mostly disagreed with, and most controversial.
  • Ula Manzo says:
    There are two “pearls of wisdom” here. First, A-R Guides can be made even more sophisticated by using a 4-point scale with the extremes being “Strongly Agree” and “Strongly Disagree” (it’s best not to use “Not Sure” as an option). Second, the author notes that lots of teachers and publishers have created A-R Guides for core middle school literature selections and posted these online. I tried out the the suggestion to Google some of these, and was more than pleasantly surprised!
  • A Template Treasure

    Activity
    readwritethink.org
    readwritethink.org
    Ula Manzo says:
    There are a lot of templates for A-R Guide worksheets out there. This is another one I like for middle school students. In addition to agree/disagree, there are columns for “Page Number,” “Were You Right,” and “Reflect.”
  • Ula Manzo says:
    I like this version of the A-R Guide for use in middle school. Instead of having students simply agree or disagree with the statements, it includes a column for them to note the page number where the found the relevant information. I like, too, that it adds “Reader’s Perspective Before Reading” and “Reader’s Perspective After Reading.” There is a great example of A-R Guide statements, and don’t miss the video at the bottom of the page for the addition of Partner Reading!
  • Ula Manzo says:
    Two teachers tell what they like about the A-R Guide. The science teacher in the first video gives a great explanation of how she comes up with statements for the A-R Guide. Then a math teacher explains how she uses the A-R Guide for formative assessment: to see if students know what she thinks they should have learned. Along with the basic steps in using an A-R Guide, there are some great ideas for modifying the A-R Guide templates.