High School
Cross-Curricular

Partner Up for Think-Pair-Share

Think-Pair-Share is a cooperative discussion strategy that was first developed by Professor Frank Lyman and his colleagues at the University of Maryland in 1981. When a teacher asks a question there will be a few students who are quick to answer and a few who rarely ever do. T-P-S ensures that every student has increased “think time” when a question is posed, and that every student responds.
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A Collection By Ula Manzo
  • 7 Collection Items
  • 7 Collection Items
  • Discussion
Partner Up for Think-Pair-Share
  • Think-Pair-Share Variations

    Website Blog
    learningisgrowing.wordpress.com
    learningisgrowing.wordpress.com
    Ula Manzo says:
    Here are some “no-tech” variations on T-P-S, such as Think and Draw-Pair-Share, and Mix-Pair-Share. Then there is an amazing list of technology-enhanced variations, such as Think-Text-Share, Think-Pair-Wordle-Share, and Think-Blog-Respond.
  • davestuartjr.com
    davestuartjr.com

    Starting Strong with "Transformative," Simple Think-Pair-Share

    Article
    Ula Manzo says:
    Here is a college instructor’s use of T-P-S, including a video. One great point he makes is that you can have a quick response T-P-S or an extended T-P-S. He provides a link to 8 types of questions that are especially useful in T-P-S, and describes additional “engagement triggers” such as cartoons photographs, and video clips. He also suggests using some of the T-P-S questions on exams to encourage a high level of student participation in the Pair step.
  • blogs.edweek.org
    blogs.edweek.org

    A Think-Pair-Share on Think-Pair-Share

    Article
    Ula Manzo says:
    This blogger has some unique suggestions for using T-P-S. One is having students write during the Pair step on some occasions; another is having students share their partner’s response instead of their own during the Share step. This really encourages focusing and listening. He also underscores the importance of the teacher circulating around the classroom during the Pair step to keep tabs on how well students are understanding the question, and how much time should be spent in the Share step.
  • readingquest.org
    readingquest.org

    Think-Pair-Share

    Article
    Ula Manzo says:
    This discussion includes a link to “Clock Buddies”—and a downloadable handout—as a quick way to pair students with different partners over time. I used a similar technique for years, and found that it has this huge benefit.
  • ablconnect.harvard.edu
    ablconnect.harvard.edu

    Pair and Share

    Article
    Ula Manzo says:
    Here is another quick video that introduces some creative variations on T-P-S, and some of its research-documented benefits—including the long-term effect of increased problem-solving ability and conceptual reasoning skill.
  • Ula Manzo says:
    This high school teacher talks about some of the ways she uses Think-Pair-Share to get her students talking without feeling stressed—talking in French, that is! What better way to teach a language than to increase the amount of time students spend using it?
  • Ula Manzo says:
    This is a perfect one-page introduction to Think-Pair-Share. It answers the questions, “What Is It?” “Why Is It Important?” and “How Can You Make It Happen?” In a nutshell, “Students have the opportunity to learn higher-level thinking skills from their peers, gain the extra time or prompting they may need, and gain confidence when reporting ideas to the whole class.” Tips are offered for selecting the best questions for T-P-S.
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