Lower Elementary
English Language Arts

Sight Words: Automa—what?

Contrary to common usage of the term “sight words,” no words, in and of themselves, are “sight words.” Sight words are the words that a given person can read instantly, i.e., with automaticity. For mature readers, all words are sight words (with only the occasional exception). Popular “sight word lists” simply are words that most people acquire first as sight words, but there are many other such words. Early acquisition of a sight word vocabulary supports ongoing development of decoding skills.
A Collection By Ula Manzo
  • 8 Collection Items
  • 8 Collection Items
  • Discussion
Sight Words: Automa—what?
  • Ula Manzo says:
    Joseph Torgesen, nationally known researcher and author of “Catch Them Before They Fail,” among many other books and articles, opens this presentation with a beautiful little essay about learning to read. By slide 16, he puts together the pieces of learning to read, emphasizing the importance of each piece, including the sight word strand.
  • Ula Manzo says:
    It would be fun to follow up this video with any of the sight word games—using the words from the song. It’s so engaging it could even be used as a reward for good behavior during seatwork activities.
  • everydaylife.globalpost.com
    everydaylife.globalpost.com

    Games and Activities for Dr. Fry's Sight Words

    Article
    Ula Manzo says:
    Silly Sentences, Rainbow Words, Pow, and Swat That Word are described here. Each of these games is sure to be a big hit in PK-1 classrooms. There are even more sight word activities, games, and worksheets in the 6 “Related Articles” links. The familiar Go Fish, Matching, and Bingo games transformed into sight word games are always fun, but among these linked gems there is also the idea of a sight word walk around the school or neighborhood, and putting together a collection of common words.
  • Ula Manzo says:
    In this interactive game, players can choose a 6-card, a 12-card, or a 24-card version. When a card is picked, the word is shows and said. Twelve of the most frequently occurring sight words are included in the game.
  • Dolch Kit

    Website
    theschoolbell.com
    theschoolbell.com
    Ula Manzo says:
    There’s lots to explore in The Dolch Kit, including some great tips for organizing your classroom sight word materials, a downloadable student practice book, and lots of games and game boards. When preparing word cards for games, you might want to throw in some environmental print cards that children will know, such as the McDonald’s sign, a stop sign, and Sesame Street.
  • Ula Manzo says:
    Every PK-1 teacher should bookmark this site. It outlines a basic 30-minute routine for teaching sight words—15 minutes of instruction and 15 minutes of game play. It makes the important point that a child needs to have automaticity with naming all of the small case letters before engaging in sight word activities (although they do not need to know the letter sounds). Don’t miss the short video clips of each step in the routine, and don’t miss the great explanations of the games.
  • Ula Manzo says:
    This is hysterical. But also sad. It is included here as a reminder to pay attention to where our students are. We usually take this phrase to mean that students may be below where we assume they are, but it can also mean the opposite. Note that the child is reading from a paper that his kindergarten teacher has sent home.
  • scholastic.com
    scholastic.com

    Sight Words 101

    Article
    Ula Manzo says:
    Here’s a great resource to share with PK-1 parents. It explains why it is helpful to teach some words as sight words: a) the 220 words on the Dolch list, as an example, make up about 75% of all the words in books; b) many of these high-frequency words are phonetically irregular, and can’t be decoded using phonics generalizations; and c) many can’t be represented concretely (such as “it” and “just”). There is a link to the Dolch word lists and 4 fun games to help children learn them.