High School
Cross-Curricular

Take Note! The Cornell Way

Walter Pauk, of Cornell University, created Cornell Notes in the 1950s. More than a simply a note-taking technique or format, Cornell Notes are the basis of a study system fashioned from the Principles of Learning that are the centerpiece of Pauk’s best-selling text, How to Study in College, which is currently in its 9th edition. You will find these Principles in this Collection, as well as a few ways to use Cornell Notes that are not widely known.
A Collection By Ula Manzo
  • 7 Collection Items
  • 7 Collection Items
  • Discussion
Take Note! The Cornell Way
  • Ula Manzo says:
    Here is a great PowerPoint Presentation from a student’s point of view. A cute piece that this adds is, “How do I know if what the teacher says is important?” (and then she explains how). This would be a good presentation to use mid-semester, to remind students of the key points in using Cornell Notes (for that repetition, repetition.)
  • winnipegsd.ca
    winnipegsd.ca

    Putting it All Together

    Article
    Ula Manzo says:
    This booklet has lots of study skills resources, including general tips and a handy checklist for student use. Pages 9-11 describe Pauk’s 6 Principles of Learning, and pages 12-14 translate the Principles into what they mean for teachers.
  • learningsolutionsmag.com
    learningsolutionsmag.com

    Brain Science: Overcoming the Forgetting Curve by Art Kohn : Learning Solutions Magazine

    Article
    Ula Manzo says:
    Most of the resources here stress that the left side of Cornell notes should be filled in AFTER taking the notes. One video explains that the reason for this is the “Curve of Forgetting” that is further explained in this resource. What none of the resources mention is the reason for using only the FRONT side of the pages for notes. This is so you can lay the pages of notes out across a table, overlapping them with only the left side showing.
  • Ula Manzo says:
    Using abbreviations is a key skill in note-taking. Here is a great resource list of abbreviations that could be introduced in sections to students. In this age of texting, students will know most of the abbreviations for everyday language, but possibly not so many of the more academic ones such as NB, i.e., and viz.
  • Ula Manzo says:
    This resource translates the note-taking/study process into the 5 R’s of Record, Reduce, Recite, Reflect, and Review. The 5 R’s would make a great classroom poster. Check out the link on this page to Listening—another key component of classroom note-taking. The 3 A’s of Listening are Attitude, Attention, and Adjustment.
  • pvhigh.com
    pvhigh.com

    Cornell Notes

    Article
    Ula Manzo says:
    Here is a great video to show students how to go further with Cornell Notes. It explains how the system can be used as a study system, based on one of Pauk’s Principles of Learning: repetition. The key is to NOT fill in the brief cues in the left-hand section WHILE taking notes, but to go back and do that as soon as possible AFTER taking the notes. This taps the 10-minute/24-minute/7-day repetition strategy to halt forgetting.
  • Ula Manzo says:
    This video of a science teacher explains Cornell Notes to her students would be a great way to introduce Cornell Notes to your students. She explains how to use each section of the format, and I especially like the way she explains the summary section at the bottom: “If I was going to explain this to somebody else, what would I say?”
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BloomBoard Asks:How have you applied ideas from this collection to your classroom?