Middle School
English Language Arts

Comparing and contrasting reading to listening or viewing

The goal of RL.6.7 is for students to learn how to compare and contrast the experience of reading a story, drama, or poem to listening to or viewing the text in other media. This playlist focuses on Robert Frost's poem "Good Hours," and includes an audio and video version of the poem, as well as the written version. Before the Frost poem, the playlist also includes sample lessons, including a fun Halloween-themed lesson comparing the experience of listening to and watching scary stories.
A Collection By Wisewire
  • 9 Collection Items
  • 9 Collection Items
  • Discussion
Comparing and contrasting reading to listening or viewing
  • Wisewire says:
    This guided lesson has students comparing the 1964 film adaptation of "Island of the Blue Dolphins" to the original novel. If you have access to, or are able to obtain copies of, both the novel and the film for your class, this lesson allows for an in-depth analysis of a feature-length film adapted from a novel. It can take place over multiple class periods. The lesson provides graphic organizers for students to use as they watch the movie, or you can provide your students with your own.
  • Happy Halloween!

    Website
    betterlesson.com
    betterlesson.com
    Wisewire says:
    How is the experience of listening to a story different than watching a scary movie? In this special Halloween lesson, students compare the experiences of watching and listening to scary stories. Before students begin, give them time to think about how these experiences might be similar and different. The lesson includes multiple examples of scary stories to compare, including Edgar Allen Poe's poem "Tell Tale Heart."
  • Wisewire says:
    In this video, students compare the written text of the Shel Silverstein poem "Whatif" to a video version of the poem. The video provides guiding questions for students to use after viewing or reading each version. What do I "see"? What do I "hear"? What don't I see or hear? These questions allow students to begin the process of analyzing different versions of the poem before they begin comparing the visuals to the text.
  • Wisewire says:
    This audio version of Robert Frost's "Good Hours" is read by Alan Davis Drake. To access the audio mp3, select the goodhours_frost_add.mp3 link, which is 12 items down on the list.
  • Wisewire says:
    This unique visual version of "Good Hours" includes a narrator reading the poem over an animation of kinetic text on the screen. This video is a good example of a visual version of a text that is different than what students might usually expect from a visual performance such as a stage play or movie. This video may be supplemented by asking students to think of other ways the poem could be visualized besides a performance by actors.
  • Wisewire says:
    Students can watch this live version of "Little Lord Fauntleroy" before they read the text excerpt. This version of the story was filmed in 1936, so you might want to explain to students that the film will be in black and white and might be very different from the movies they are used to watching. The times corresponding to the excerpt are provided in the Student Edition, but you may also wish to show students the rest of the film.
  • Wisewire says:
    This Blendspace presentation includes all of the resources presented in this playlist, as well as other resources you may wish to use to teach students how to compare and contrast reading to listening or viewing.
  • Wisewire says:
    Use this Blendspace presentation to guide your students through your lesson on comparing and constrasting reading to listening or viewing.
  • Wisewire says:
    Download all of the resources from this playlist from the Wisewire website.
BloomBoard SparkOther Cross-Curricular
BloomBoard Asks:In what audio and visual forms can a text be presented, and how do they differ from just reading the text?